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Gustav Mahler - Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor | Gustavo Dudamel

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Mahler - Symphony No 5 in C sharp minor - Nott

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Mahler: Symphony no 5 in C sharp minor

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Usual Name Gustav Mahler
Alternative Spellings Gustav Maler, Charles Adler Mahler, G. Mahler
On Wikipedia Gustav_Mahler
Ensembles Vienna State Opera Orchestra from 1897 to 1907
New York Philharmonic from 1909 to 1911
Vienna Philharmonic from 1898 to 1901
Links RISM personVIAFGND

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Gustav Mahler - Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor | Gustavo Dudamel

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Mahler - Symphony No 5 in C sharp minor - Nott

Support us on Patreon and get more content: https://www.patreon.com/classicalvault --- Gustav Mahler Symphony No 5 in C sharp minor 1 Trauermarsch. In gemessenem Schritt. 2 Stürmisch bewegt, mit größter Vehemenz 3 Scherzo. Kräftig, nicht zu schnell 4 Adagietto. Sehr langsam 5 Rondo-Finale. Allegro - Allegro giocoso. Frisch Bamberg Symphony Orchestra Jonathan Nott conductor Live recording. London, Proms 2013

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Mahler: Symphony no 5 in C sharp minor

Hugh Wolff leads the New England Conservatory Philharmonia in a performance of Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 5 in C Sharp Minor. Recorded live in NEC's Jordan Hall, Boston, on September 30, 2015. Conductor Hugh Wolff's work with Mahler has been well received by Boston audiences, particularly during NEC's "Mahler Unleashed" season in 2011. "As thrilling as any performance on record" (Boston Globe) was among the accolades for Mahler's First Symphony as performed by the NEC Philharmonia under Wolff's baton. About New England Conservatory A cultural icon that will mark its 150th anniversary in 2017, New England Conservatory (NEC) is recognized worldwide as a leader among music schools. Located in Boston, Massachusetts, NEC offers rigorous training in an intimate, nurturing community to undergraduate, graduate, and post-graduate music students from around the world. The only conservatory in the United States designated a National Historic Landmark, NEC presents more than 1000 free concerts each year. Many of these take place in Jordan Hall (which shares National Historic Landmark status with the school), world-renowned for its superb acoustics and beautifully restored interior. Follow us! http://facebook.com/necmusic http://twitter.com/necmusic http://instagram.com/necmusic

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Mahler - Symphony No 5 in C-sharp minor - Bernstein

Support us on Patreon and get more content: https://www.patreon.com/classicalvault --- Gustav Mahler Symphony No 5 in C-sharp minor Wiener Philharmoniker Leonard Bernstein

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Symphony No.5 in C sharp minor - Gustav Mahler

Tonhalle Orchestra Zurich conducted by David Zinman Teil I I - Trauermarsch. In gemessenem Schritt. Streng. Wie ein Kondukt: 0:00 II - Stürmisch bewegt. Mit größter Vehemenz: 13:21 Teil II III - Scherzo. Kräftig, nicht zu schnell: 28:45 Teil III IV - Adagietto, Sehr langsam: 47:29 V - Rondo-Finale. Allegro: 58:17 Mahler's fifth symphony was begun in 1901, after a serious illness: The night between February 24 and 25, Mahler almost died of a severe intestinal bleeding. During his convalescence, he made the schemes of the first movements. The following summer, at the end of June, when he returned to his composing place in Maiernigg he had begun a new life. He was not alone, accompanied by his wife Alma, who replaced his sister Justine as a housewife. Alma could also help her husband in his musical aspect by having extensive knowledge of music. She will be responsible for copying the score of the new symphony. On August 24, the score is finished, interpreting it on the piano in his Häuschen for his beloved wife Alma. Mahler made revisions, not finishing it until the fall of 1903. Mahler decides to perform the new symphony in the Gürzenich Konzerte cycle in Cologne, with the Vienna Philharmonic, but during rehearsals in September 1904 he decides that he will have to revise the orchestration. In spite of everything, the work is premiered in Cologne on October 18, 1904. But the reaction of the public and criticism is divided. The symphony is published in Germany by Peters, but Mahler begins his interminable corrections that would last until 1909, although Peters refused to publish them. The first movement consists of a funeral march with two intermediate sections as trios. It begins with a trumpet fanfare that gives way to a military-style funeral march. A second element is added in the form of a sad melody of the cellos following the rhythm of the march. All this first section is repeated in a varied way. The initial fanfare begins the first trio. A violent episode that ends when the initial fanfare and the themes of the march return. A roll of the timpani, following the motif of the fanfare, begins the second trio, which begins with the violins and takes elements of the first theme in varied form. It ends with a crescendo, after which the initial fanfare returns until the trumpet is left alone. In the coda appear elements of the march that are blurring to disappear. The second movement begins in an agitated and expressionistic way, the violins present a tortured melody that is stopped by the brass. Then the orchestra is totally unstable, until the second theme appears, based on the melody of the second trio of the previous movement. One returns to the agitated atmosphere of the beginning of the movement, being stopped by a wide cantinela of the cellos to which they are adding other elements. It follows a complicated development where the previous elements are mixed in daring counterpoints, taking the music to a state of growing excitement until the recapitulation with the tortured initial melody of the violins. Then follows quotations of the following subjects and a fight among them begins until it is stopped by a chorale in the form of solemn hymn in two parts, separated by a fanfare. It returns to the initial expressionist agitation that culminates in a climax. Calm returns, ending with the dissolution of the elements of the march. With this movement, ends the first part of the symphony, its most tragic side. The second part of the work begins with a complicated scherzo, mixed with sonata elements. The themes used are a string of light waltzes derived from the German ländler. A horn call introduces the first waltz, in a style close to Richard Strauss's music. The second waltz is played at a slower tempo. The first one reappears in a development section of the themes. A phrase of the horn precedes the trio. It begins with an extraordinary pizzicato of the strings with themes derived from the previous ones. Continues with a personal development before returning to the scherzo section in the form of recapitulation. Variations of all the previous sections appear. The dull sound of the bass drum begins the end. The strings first and other instruments later recall one of the elements of the first waltz. The entrance of the horns leads the movement to its end. [Description continued in the comment section] Source: https://bit.ly/2PCI6n2

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Mahler : Symphony No. 4 in G major

Mahler : Symphony No. 4 in G major Eiko Kitazawa (Soprano) Hidemaro Konoye The New Symphony Orchestra of Tokio The world's first recording the Symphony No. 4 of Mahler: May 28, 1930 Viscount Hidemaro Konoye (近衛 秀麿 Konoe Hidemaro, 18 November 1898 -- 2 June 1973) was a conductor and composer of classical music in Shōwa period Japan. He was the younger brother of pre-war Japanese Prime Minister Fumimaro Konoe. The orchestra began as the New Symphony Orchestra on October 5, 1926 and was the country's first professional symphony orchestra. Later, it changed its name to the Japan Symphony Orchestra. In 1951, after receiving financial support from NHK,the orchestra took its current name.

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